Blind Cricket

History

Sport for the blind is a rightful pursuit and it forms a platform for physical and social development. Individuals with visual impairment are passionate about cricket and overcome great odds to play the game.

Cricket for the Blind was first introduced by Australia in 1920s and made its first appearance in India in 1980.

The primitive form of Cricket for the Blind in India was played by replacing the ball with an empty tin and a stick for a bat. The replacement was to enable the visually impaired hear and identify the location of ball and hit accordingly.
Players were dependant on audio cues to execute the game. Eventually, audio ball replaced the empty tin and bats for sticks. The audio ball, designed by National Institute for the Visually Handicapped (NIVH), Dehradun, is currently accepted as an international standard ball. Verbal signals are used by players and umpires such as shouting the word ‘play’ while delivering the ball. The delivery is required to pitch at least twice when bowled to the batsman.
The game started garnering support in due course and the first National Tournament took place in 1990. World Blind Cricket Limited (WBC), established in 1996, governs Cricket for the Blind with an objective of promoting and administering the game of Cricket for the Blind globally. Following was the first World Cup for the blind organized in 1998. After the formation of Cricket Association for Blind in India (CABI) in 2010, it has been organizing cricket for the blind tours and tournaments in India and abroad and relentlessly working on blind cricket awareness. The games organized and conducted by CABI have been increasing with each passing season with increasing ardor towards improving on them. Today, CABI is the apex body governing Cricket for the Blind in India and wishes to effort further with continuous support from one and all.

Concept of Blind Cricket

THE GAME

  • Bowling is underarm and the ball has to pitch once before the mid pitch and also one pitch before the batsman

  • The bowler gives an audio clue before bowling and the batsmen gives an audio clue when he is ready

  • The boundaries are between 45 and 50 yards from the pitch

THE TEAM AND PLAYERS

  • The match is played between two teams of 11 players each

  • Minimum 4 totally blind players (B1)

  • Minimum 3 partially blind players (B2)

  • Maximum of 4 partially sighted players (B3)

PLAYER IDENTIFICATION

  • B1 players wear a White Wrist Band or one stripe on the upper arm may also be used.

  • B2 players wear a Red Wrist Band or two stripes on the upper arm may also be used.

  • B3 players wear a Blue Wrist Band or three stripes on the upper arm may also be used.

THE PITCH

  • All International matches will be played on a surface mutually agreeable to the participating teams.

  • Preference of the WBC is always turf or synthetic grass surfaces.

THE WICKETS

  • Each wicket shall consist of three tubular stumps made of hollow metal pipe.

  • The colour of the wickets shall be fluorescent orange or yellow.

THE BALL

  • The ball that is approved by the World Blind Cricket Ltd. (WBC) shall be used in all international matches.

  • An audio ball made of hard plastic and filled with tiny ball bearings is used.

THE BAT

  • The regular cricket bat to be used with standard specifications.

BOWLING

  • Minimum 40% of the overs should be bowled by the B1 players (totally blind).

SCORING

  • All runs scored off the bat by a B1 batsman shall be doubled and will be credited to the batsman.

CAUGHT

  • A “one bounce” catch by a B1 player will result in the batsman being given out.

THE FIELDSMAN

  • No fielder shall dive, or lie down until the batsman has played a stroke or the ball has passed the batsman.

Team Selection Process

  • Applications are received by State affiliated Cricket Associations from players to participate in the subsequent matches. All applications are screened by a Selection Committee constituting 4 Zonal Secretaries, 1 President and 1 External Authority, and shortlist a team.

  • Respective Associations will organize State Tournaments for the shortlisted team for expert evaluation and finalize the State Level Team. CABI has 24 states representation from all the 4 Zones. The panel selection committee chairman along with 4 selection committee members will be monitoring the zonal matches (East, West, North and South).

  • Winners and Runners up will be qualified for the nationals. Eight teams will be participating in nationals.

  • C.A.B.I identifies a core group of 30 potential players from the National Tournaments organized. A final team of 17 members will be selected based on the performance during a selection trial camp organized. (scheduled from 2nd to 8th of Dec – Kochi).

  • The Final Team of selected players to represent India in World Cup and other International matches is announced in a Press Conference/Launch Event.

CABI Rules and Regulations

In this document He, His, Him, Player, Batsman Fielder, and Bowler all refer to both genders.

Please note that rules of cricket that have not been covered in the Following playing conditions will be applicable as per the current W.B.C.C and M.C.C. Rules of Cricket.

Interpretation:
WBCC rules: It refers to current WBCC International Cricket playing rules Core Document 2. Ratified October 2005, Second Revision @ January 2007, Updated May 2007.

QUOTE FROM THE MCC LAWS OF CRICKET 2003

The Spirit of Cricket
“Cricket is a game that owes much of its unique appeal to the fact that it should be played not only within its Laws but also within the Spirit of the Game. Any action which is seen to abuse this spirit causes injury to the game itself. The major responsibility for ensuring the spirit of fair play rests with the captains.

There are two Laws which place the responsibility for the team's conduct firmly on the captain.
RESPONSIBILITY OF CAPTAINS
The captains are responsible at all times for ensuring that play is conducted within the Spirit of the Game as well as within the Laws.

1. Players’ conduct
In the event of a player failing to comply with instructions by an umpire, or criticising by word or action the decisions of an umpire, or showing dissent, or generally behaving in a manner which might bring the game into disrepute, the umpire concerned shall in the first place report the matter to the other umpire and to the player's captain, and instruct the latter to take action.

2. Fair and unfair play
According to the Laws the umpires are the sole judges of fair and unfair play. The umpires may intervene at any time and it is the responsibility of the captain to take action where required.

The umpires are authorised to intervene in cases of:
• Time wasting
• Damaging the pitch
• Dangerous or unfair bowling
• Tampering with the ball
• Any other action that they consider to be unfair
The Spirit of the Game involves RESPECT for:
• Your opponents
• Your own captain and team
• The role of the umpires
• The game's traditional values

It is against the Spirit of the Game:
• To dispute an umpire's decision by word, action or gesture
• To direct abusive language towards an opponent or umpire
• To indulge in cheating or any sharp practice, for instance:
(a) To appeal knowing that the batsman is not out
(b) To advance towards an umpire in an aggressive manner when appealing
(c) To seek to distract an opponent either verbally or by harassment with persistent clapping or unnecessary noise under the guise of enthusiasm and motivation of one's own side.

Violence:
There is no place for any act of violence on the field of play. Players, Captains and umpires together set the tone for the conduct of a cricket match. Every player is expected to make an important contribution to this.”
 
1. THE TEAM AND PLAYERS
2. SIGHT CLASSIFICATION
3. IDENTIFYING CLASSIFICATION ON THE FIELD OF PLAY
4. THE COMPOSITION OF THE TEAM
5. THE UMPIRES
6. THE SCORERS
7. Twenty-20 World Cup Competition Rules
8. TWENTY 20 RULES OF PLAY
9. FIELDING RESTRICTIONS
10. THE SUBSTITUTES AND RUNNERS
11. THE OVER
12. THE SCORING AND PENALTY’S
13. THE CATCH
14. DISMISSALS
15. THE WIDE BALL
16. THE NO BALL
17. THE PITCH
18. THE BAT
19. THE BALL
20. THE WICKETS
21. PROTECTIVE CLOTHING
22. THE BATSMAN
23. THE BOWLING AND THE BOWLER
24. THE WICKET KEEPER

APPENDIX - 1

Black-Out Glasses Rules of Use

1. All B1 Players that take the field (cross the boundary line) at any time during a match must wear WBCC approved Black-Out Glasses

2. All Black-Out Glasses must be presented to the Tournament/Match Referee and Umpires for inspection and approval prior to the commencement of any match.

3. Umpires are to re inspect Black-Out Glasses as players enter the field of play to ensure the Black-Out Glasses are being worn correctly.

4. Black-Out Glasses may not be removed or adjusted during the period a player is on the field of play unless permission has been granted by one of the officiating umpires:

a) When permission has been granted, the player must face away from the pitch area whilst the Black-Out Glasses are adjusted or removed to wipe sweat away etc. The closest umpire must again inspect that the Black-Out Glasses are being worn correctly before play recommences.

5. If the Black-Out Glasses are broken or damaged at any time, they are to be immediately presented to the Match Referee or umpire for inspection and replacement if required.

6. After the conclusion of the match the Blackout glasses must be returned to Match Referee/Umpires.


Penalty for non compliance of the Black-Out Glasses Rules of Use:

1. If a player adjusts or removes the Black-Out Glasses whilst on the field of play without prior permission from one of the officiating umpires, an official warning is to be given to the offending player and Captain.

2. If the same player offends for a second time in the same match, a penalty of 5 runs is to be awarded to the opposing team.

3. If the same player offends for a third time in the same match, a further penalty of 10 runs is to be awarded to the opposing team and the offending player is no longer permitted to participate in the remainder of the match/tournament.
© 2018 CABI. All Rights Reserved.